Welcome to the European Society for Ecological Economics (ESEE)!

ESEE is the European branch of the International Society of Ecological Economics (ISEE).

ESEE is a non-profit, member-governed, organisation dedicated to advancing understanding of the relationships among ecological, social and economic systems for the mutual well-being of nature and people.

ESEE publishes a newsletter and books (in association with various publishers); holds regional and international meetings; develops educational materials; and facilitates a voice for ecological economists in public forums.

ESEE provides a forum so that we might all better understand these issues. Add your voice to the discussion by becoming a member.

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Recent Posts


Marine modelling job opportunities at Strathclyde University

This is a really serious initiative to develop societally and policy relevant mathematical modelling capability in the marine field. Strathclyde are looking for exciting new staff at all levels from Lecturer to Professor.

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3 Post-Doctoral Research Positions

Opening for 3 Post-doctoral research positions, each starting in November 2017, of which 2 positions will be held at the Centre for Development and Environment of the University of Bern (Switzerland) for a period of 36 months each and one position at the School of Agricultural Policy and Development of the University of Reading (UK) for a period of 42 months. These 3 research positions are part of the ERC Consolidator Grant funded project “Indigenous Communities, Land Use and Tropical Deforestation” (INCLUDE).

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Special issue on Degrowth and Environmental justice

Both environmental justice (EJ) and degrowth groups question the idea of development based on economic growth, and at times even the notion of development itself (Kothari et al 2015). They oppose certain socio metabolic re-configurations and the uneven distribution of benefits and burdens associated with them (Martinez Alier 2002; D’Alisa et al 2015). In this special issue, we propose to explore these and other dimensions of the relationship between degrowth and environmental justice: be them political, like the rapprochement of climate justice, anti-coal mining and degrowth (or postwachstum) movements in Germany; or theoretical, where various cross-fertilisations between degrowth and EJ movements can be explored, such as the traversing and cross-mobilization of concepts across the two (e.g. degrowth concepts of autonomy, simplicity or care; or EJ concepts of ecological debt, ecological unequal exchange or popular epidemiology).

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