Welcome to the European Society for Ecological Economics (ESEE)!

ESEE is the European branch of the International Society of Ecological Economics (ISEE).

ESEE is a non-profit, member-governed, organisation dedicated to advancing understanding of the relationships among ecological, social and economic systems for the mutual well-being of nature and people.

ESEE publishes a newsletter and books (in association with various publishers); holds regional and international meetings; develops educational materials; and facilitates a voice for ecological economists in public forums.

ESEE provides a forum so that we might all better understand these issues. Add your voice to the discussion by becoming a member.

You can stay up to date by subscribing to our newsletter.

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Recent Posts


Results of the ESEE Board elections held in December 2015

As the ESEE, we have been holding elections during the last month for the terms of office of the ESEE President, 2 Vice-Presidents and 3 Board Members. This year we unfortunately had no nominees for the open position of a second student representative and hence did not run a separate election in parallel for Student Representative.

101 members of the 274 ESEE members in 2015 voted, so that the 20% quorum was fulfilled.

As announced on the ESEE website (http://www.euroecolecon.org/governance/esee-elections/), we had 3 candidates standing for the open positions of ESEE President and 2 Vice-Presidents for the term 2016-2018. We asked whether ESEE members support these candidates for the respective positions and here are the results. » Read the full article

Workshop on Agent-based modelling in Ecological Economics

The Sustainability Research Center SustBusy at ESCP Europe Business School is offering a Research Workshop on  “Agent-based modelling (ABM) in Ecological Economics – A useful tool or just a fancy gadget?” on May 20th and 21st 2016 in Berlin. » Read the full article

Feminist Economics Special Issue Call For Papers

Feminist Economics invites papers for a new special issue on ‘Sustainability, Ecology, and Care’.

Caring, both in the practical sense of hands-on carework and in the emotional and ethical sense of “caring about,” has been a central focus of feminist economics. Feminist economists have reclaimed care as a subject of economic analysis, delving into its implications for economic methodology and advocating for appropriate support for carework activities directed toward the young, very old, and ill.  Feminist economists have at times also engaged with the pressing problem of environmental deterioration – exemplified by crises such as climate change, species extinction, and water scarcity – but the analysis is not as advanced. Ecological economics has at times incorporated questions of gender in its analyses, but here again the inquiry is limited. » Read the full article